Thursday, January 4, 2018

What...happened? 2017 Review, and 2018 Goals

2017 was not a good sewing year for me, and I need to figure out why.

Let's go through the projects I started (or continued from a previous year), shall we?  Maybe I will feel better, since it feels like I barely finished anything...to the point of someone on the HSM FB group asking to share the project you are the most proud of from last year, and my mind was coming up blank.  

It was suggested I should be proud of this outfit
....I'm not so sure.

Saturday, December 30, 2017

HSM 2018...plots and thoughts

It almost didn't happen--but the denizens of the Facebook group prodded us (the Moderators) until the ball got rolling...then it kinda happened by itself, and we just had to organize.  And finalize descriptions, which was actually kinda tricky.  But we did it, and so there will be another year...and hopefully many more, so long as participants remain excited.

http://thedreamstress.com/the-historical-sew-monthly-2018/


Enough of that...  For my few readers who are not familiar with it, the Historical Sew Monthly is a series of sewing challenges or prompts for Historical Costuming, which you have to finish (NOT start) within two months of the deadline.  You can participate in many, or only manage a couple!  For more information, go to the Dreamstress' overview/sign up page

Friday, October 20, 2017

Pinterest for the Researcher



First Published in the Oerthan Chronical, 10-17.

Disclaimer: My focus is historical costuming, and I research most periods, not just pre-1600….and there are a lot more post 1680s extant pieces in museums.  But I will try to keep this as general as I can.  Hopefully these hints help!

Figure 1

Many people say to stay away from using Pinterest as a resource for your research.  Obviously, since I’m writing an article on it, I feel somewhat differently; it /can/ be used as a useful source of information…if utilized correctly.  So I composed this batch of advice, which should help keep you from the dreaded Pinterest – Tumblr loop.  However, it basically boils down to…:

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Another project Roundup? About time!

It's been a couple months since the last time posted a Project roundup of what I've been working on....I have been working on projects, just not a whole lot which is particularly interesting, since there was a lot of repeating.

Mainly, I've had two primary projects, and one secondary; the Patchwork Paletot, which is a fur lined overcoat matching my Franken-frockcoat; the trunkhose for the Hasting's Suit; and a not particularly historical waistcoat (secondary).  I haven't done any writing, and little researching, except for tidbits as needed on current or dreamed up projects.  Bad me, I know....I've been busy with other things.

But wait!!  There's apparently more...those are just the projects most recently to mind.  I had one or two other research lines in there somewhere, and I forgot that I made a good portion of my openwork shirt during the month post Coronet.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Post Coronet Project Roundup

I've been working on a few things in the last month...a couple of new projects, and one which I'm plugging away slowly at.

The highlight was I decided to make a pair of test trunkhose, in a bias cut, striped velvet--the same one my Brunswick doublet is made from, as I intended to wear it with that doublet.  The result?  Stripes...in multiple directions.

But first...
 With the buying of sole bend, and the gift of some hobnails, I decided I wanted to try making a pair of Caliga...Roman military sandals/boots.  I found that drafting was not remotely difficult...essentially trace a sole slightly smaller than the outline of your foot, measure up on the back to the desired height, then add straps; four small ones on the outside, and three on the inside.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

The Nauseatingly Stripy Trunkhose



This project is a pair of trunkhose, similar in style to those of the late 1560s, made of the same fabric and to wear with the same doublet as in the Brunswick suit.  The design is fairly general, not based on any one particular example, but is closest to one in the French rapier manual by Sainct Didier.  Because this particular project was intended more as a trial run, I am not worrying about documenting everything.

 

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Stolen: Dwarven Vest?

Nope…it’s a 16th century Irish inar.  While the garment appears to be too small to modern eyes, the fit is actually just right…for the style.  The inar was the “outer” garment of the Wild Irishman outfit, and was worn over the loose,tunic-like leine.  To the best that I can tell, the garment is unique to the culture.


Garment Description:

The inar is a short vest or jacketlike garment, most likely made of wool.  It is slightly fitted (primitively), has rudimentary sleeves, and a separate skirt (which is also short).  Did I mention the garment is short?  It comes to maybe hip length, with the waist seam somewhere around the sternum.  The neckline comes down almost to the sternum as well.  As such, it is a somewhat odd-looking piece of clothing, especially being worn over the extremely loose and bloused leine.